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Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Detectors for High Energy Astronomy

 

 

  Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Detectors for High Energy Astronomy  
       
         
  Back illuminated detectors and SDDs equally exhibit excellent properties in the optical bandwidth. If coupled to scintillators they can measure the amount of the incident light and if pixelated, the spatial intensity distribution. The low noise amplification allows for an energy resolution solely limited by the photon statistics of the light generation and collection processes in the scintillator.   Schematic of a scintillator coupled to a light sensitive silicon drift detector with the help of optical grease
A scintillator is coupled to a light sensitive silicon drift detector with the help of optical grease. The SDD is subdivided in individual cells, each equipped with an on-chip amplifier.
 
         
  Both low noise amplification and high quantum efficiency in the optical make silicon drift detectors suitable for the light detection of scintillators, e.g. CsI(Tl) or LaBr3. The segmentation of the SDDs in subunits of tens of square millimeters allows for a precise reconstruction of the light centroid of the incident X-rays and hence a space point measurement of the position of the interaction within the scintillating crystal (figure on the right). The described technique was used to proof the principle of a hard X-ray camera operational in astrophysics as well as in medical application.
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Image of a pinhole grid with six holes around a circle with a diameter of 3 mm
and a hole diameter of 300 micrometer is illuminated with X-rays of 122 keV energy